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DEFINE DECADENT

About Define Decadent and the man behind it

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MM: What first drew you to photography and what inspires you ,and when did you first begin your journey behind the camera?

SV: It was probably curiosity, years ago when I was a child I had a LOMO film camera for a while, and then about 10-12yrs ago I got a basic digital one, and then on I was hooked. Shooting things, macro, buildings, and trees, then at some point I “graduated” and got the courage to start shooting people. I started with portraits and experiments, and then that first year when the weather got cold, m and friend of mine decided to try a sensual indoor shoot. From then on, I’ve been doing this as much as I could, trying to learn, to improve my skills and to perfect this craft.

What do you think makes your work memorable?

SV: I guess that would be my general desire to shoot more of a sensual and delicate imagery, rather than suggestive or over-the-top nakedness. Also, contrary to boudoir standards, I mostly use light to shape and mask my models. My images are bright and airy, and not dark and moody which is sort of normal for boudoir and sensual photography.

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I also think of my work more as of a lifestyle photography, with a hint of fun and naughtiness. I don’t go for static and overused model poses, I just improvise and try to make the best of whatever situation me and the model have put ourselves in. I try to create a candid and natural atmosphere, after that the photos just come out of that by themselves without too much direction and guidance.

What does photography mean to you?

It’s what I do for a living, it’s also an amazing avenue to meet cool and inspiring people, to create beautiful and moving images.

Are you always in photographer mode?

SV: Lately, I’ve caught myself more and more in that mode, looking and lines, structure, and composition in random situations LOL 

Also, I’ve had moments when I glance at a woman on the street or in a cafe, and immediately n my head I’ve created scenarios and situations where she is modeling and I am shooting. Weird like that, I guess?

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How does black and white vs. color play into your work?

SV: I’ve had periods where I’d edited half of my work in Black and white, but lately, I’ve been mostly working in color, without a specific reason, other than I like the warmth and the look that it gives me. At some point, I will add more black and white images to my portfolio, but it isn’t a particular plan or something like that.

How important is it for a photographer to “connect” withhis subjects to bring out their true self?

SV: This is MY MAIN GOAL. I always tell this to whoever I am working with – my real and only aim is to make the person feel comfortable and to enjoy the process. Like I said – after that is achieved, the images just start flowing, and I often end up with 5 times the amount I was supposed to have, which is a cool problem to have, I think 🙂 

Locations and weather conditions seems to be a crucial aspect to a successful picture. How do you handle these unpredictable factors?

SV: The way I shoot and focus on the subject, in terms of composition, lighting, and aperture, the location is not that important in my work. I just need a couple of windows and some privacy so we can create in comfort and without getting disturbed, or being a nuisance to anyone. I mostly shoot indoors, because I feel like that adds up to the candid and natural feel of the images. Not that I have anything against shooting beautiful women in a forest or on a beach, but I just haven’t felt that strong enough to go for it that often.

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What do you want your viewers to take away from your work?

SV: One main thing – that beauty and sensuality are not about numbers, sizes, and such insignificant details – it is about attitude and about the feeling inside. I shoot mostly with non-pro models, so I really like making someone look at themselves from a different angle and seeing their true beauty.

What do you think are some of the things  in photography yousteer away from yourself?

SV: Hmm, I don’t know, I guess trends and weird fads are something I don’t really like going for. Like specific cliche poses, face-time shoots, and things like that. Sometimes I do trendy stuff, later on in time, I guess, but it’s more about what I’ve felt towards a certain method, rather than if it’s cool and trendy, or if I’ve missed the bandwagon.

What were the difficulties you encountered when you first started photography?

SV: Getting the nerve to talk to people and to suggest we shoot together. Gear and things like that have been a pain at times, but in general, getting people to shoot with or enough clients is what I struggled the most in the beginning. 

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What are your thoughts on working single images verses projects?

SV: Coming from a background of graphic design and branding, working on projects or image series is natural for me, I feel like a single image can be powerful, but simply not as powerful as a series of images, that creates a mood and sets an atmosphere that moves and inspires.

What are the disadvantages you face as a photographer, in this industry?

 SV: I haven’t faced any major setbacks and disadvantages so far, I think I’ve had a smooth ride more or less. Basi things like decency and professionalism are important for me and probably this is what has gotten me through unscathed so far.

What is one question nobody has ever asked you which you wish they would asked?

SV: How would you like to have these $50K and shoot for us? LOL 

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SV: I’ve heard all sorts of weird questions, nothing surprises me anymore. Maybe the question I don’t want to get asked again is “How is your girlfriend OK with your shoots” LOL 

As a photographer, can you explain what the difference between beauty and vulgarity when it comes to modeling?

SV: It’s the same principle that applies in real life I think – some people are vulgar and seek attention, some are beautiful without shoving it in people’s faces. I prefer the latter, I naturally gravitate towards that, people that are too vulgar generally don’t like my work and my style anyway, so it’s all good, things fall where they need to be.

Which style of photography do you prefer, high fashion or eye candy?

SV: Lifestyle 🙂 Natural and candid, so I guess that means eye-candy? 

How has the “Game” changed in your opinion?

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SV: The accessibility in the industry and social media has saturated the market really heavily and sometimes that dilutes the Game and messes up the overall flow of things. Apart from that – again, decency and professionalism usually man that things will go pretty much as they have always been, good work will always be good work, and even if sometimes social engagement and scandalous content overtake the scene, good work will always get recognized by the people that matter.

We truly appreciate you allowing us to interview you, what’s in store for you in the future?

SV: I have no idea! With all the craziness in the world, travel bans, business struggling with the new situation, I will just keep doing the best I can and hope for the best!

Thank you for the appreciation and interest in my work!

https://www.definedecadent.com/home

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Oh, don't be like that… 😏

A post shared by Sensual/Portrait Photographer (@define.decadent) on

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